The Proteintech Blog

Top Ten Awards

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Breakthrough Performance Award (First Proteintech Antibody in a Publication)

admin February 7, 2012

CSTF1  The first research paper to feature a Proteintech antibody appeared in The EMBO Journal on September 1st 2003. It reported on work done at Oxford University, UK investigating the production of the 3’ ends of pre-snRNAs (small nuclear RNAs). Our CSTF antibody (10064-2-AP) was of several used to identify known RNA cleavage factors bound to synthetic RNA… Continue Reading »

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Best Newcomer

admin February 7, 2012

FUS For some time, a debate as to whether FUS (fused in sarcoma) causes neurodegenerative disease independently of TDP-43 or not has been underway. To help out this discussion, Proteintech developed a monoclonal FUS antibody (60160-1-Ig) to further distinguish the presence of FUS in pathological protein inclusions. You can find out what frontotemporal dementia (FTD)… Continue Reading »

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Stem Cell Star

admin February 7, 2012

LIN28 I’ve voted LIN28 (11724-1-AP) our stem cell star antibody as it is one of our best in this area and is often used as a stem cell marker (see image). It first appeared in a publication featuring in Nature Genetics in 2009, describing how LIN28, and homolog LIN28B, block let-7 microRNA (miRNAs) precursors from being processed… Continue Reading »

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A Millennium Milestone

admin February 7, 2012

FAK Whilst our antibodies have featured in over 2,500 publications so far, I think our FAK antibody (12636-1-AP) deserves a mention here as it secured the 1000th such appearance of a Proteintech IgG. The paper appeared in Nature Cell Biology, and was another study looking at the biology and pathology of microRNAs (miRNAs). FAK – encoding the… Continue Reading »

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An Honorary Mention | IDH1

admin February 7, 2012

Lenny Dang and colleagues reported that cancer-associated IDH1 mutation R132H gives IDH1 a new enzymatic capability in Nature in 2009. In this paper they show the enzyme becomes able to catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of α-ketoglutarate to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). Supporting this finding, excess accumulation of 2HG is tightly linked to an elevated risk of malignant brain tumors in patients with… Continue Reading »

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